Stonehenge Story Starts: Surprises in Flight (Prompt)

Welcome to Stonehenge Story Starts, a biweekly writing prompt and story sharing opportunity.  Every other Sunday, we post a writing prompt: an opening line, a concept, a plot hook, maybe an image.  Two weeks later on Saturday, we’ll post again with the writing the prompt inspired.

This week’s prompt is: Just as your flight takes off, you discover a shocking note under your seat.

(Prompt courtesy of getfreewrite.com)

The deadline to submit your story is Friday, October 4, and we’ll post result on October 5th.

Our writers will be writing for the prompts, but anyone is welcome to participate!  Just come by on Sunday to see the week’s prompt, write during the week, and send any writing you’d like to share to StonehengeCircleWriters@gmail.com by the following Friday at 8 pm.  On Saturday we’ll post participants’ writing (with credit to the author, of course).

Write as much or as little as you choose: a paragraph, a flash fiction piece (less than 1,000 words) or a short story.  (Note, for long writing, we may choose to post only a selection.)  You are encouraged to be as creative as possible with the writing prompts.  Try to do something unexpected, or explore a particular genre like science fiction or historical fiction.  Take the prompt literally, or decide it’s a metaphor.  Your only limit is your own imagination.

Happy writing!

 

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Stonehenge Story Starts: You Can (?) Go Home Again (Results)

We hope you’re enjoying your Saturday!

This week’s prompt was:

Write a story about revisiting one’s childhood home.

 

Today’s story is from Cheryl Mahoney, writing a follow-up to her story about finding something hidden, one enchantment and 100 years later.

*****

Rose was back at the castle for many days before she returned to her old bedroom.  She wouldn’t have visited today, if Edward hadn’t suggested it.

He stopped her outside of a council meeting.  “I understand I’m living in your old rooms,” he said, smiling.  “I appreciate that you haven’t demanded them back—but I’ve been meaning to ask if you’d like to visit them?”

She hesitated.  She didn’t trust Terrence’s brothers, not even this one, who smiled more than the older two.  Was it merely chance that he’d happened to remember to make this invitation at a time when Terrence wasn’t around?  She let her eyes drop, and murmured, “I wouldn’t want to impose on you.”

Edward’s grin only grew.  “It wouldn’t be an imposition at all.  I only feel bad I didn’t invite you sooner.  I knew you’d be interested to see the place.”  He took her arm—but politely, unthreateningly—and steered her down the corridor.  “It’s right this way—well, you know that, of course.”

She could have said no.  She could have yanked her arm away, and she thought she probably would have, if he had gripped it any tighter.  But it was a polite, even courtly hold, and she wasn’t entirely certain she didn’t want to see her old bedroom.

“I quite like the place,” Edward remarked as they walked.  “So quiet, so removed.  Gives me plenty of room for thinking, you know.”

Sometimes she had liked the quiet.  Sometimes she had wondered why so many stories put princesses away in a tower, all by themselves, and why her own life had to conform to that particular narrative.

Continue reading “Stonehenge Story Starts: You Can (?) Go Home Again (Results)”

Stonehenge Story Starts: You Can (?) Go Home Again (Prompt)

Welcome to Stonehenge Story Starts, a biweekly writing prompt and story sharing opportunity.  Every other Sunday, we post a writing prompt: an opening line, a concept, a plot hook, maybe an image.  Two weeks later on Saturday, we’ll post again with the writing the prompt inspired.

This week’s prompt is: Write a story about revisiting one’s childhood home.

Our writers will be writing for the prompts, but anyone is welcome to participate!  Just come by on Sunday to see the week’s prompt, write during the week, and send any writing you’d like to share to StonehengeCircleWriters@gmail.com by the following Friday at 8 pm.  On Saturday we’ll post participants’ writing (with credit to the author, of course).

Write as much or as little as you choose: a paragraph, a flash fiction piece (less than 1,000 words) or a short story.  (Note, for long writing, we may choose to post only a selection.)  You are encouraged to be as creative as possible with the writing prompts.  Try to do something unexpected, or explore a particular genre like science fiction or historical fiction.  Take the prompt literally, or decide it’s a metaphor.  Your only limit is your own imagination.

Happy writing!

 

Stonehenge Story Starts: Mirror, Mirror (Results)

We hope you’re enjoying your Saturday!

This week’s prompt was:

Write a story about a magic mirror—what it can do, how it’s used, and who it’s used by (Prompt courtesy of @writingprompts)

We have just one story today: Cheryl Mahoney gave us a glimpse of a moment between two characters in her upcoming novel.

*****

            “Rose?  Rose, I know you can hear me.”

Rose didn’t lift her head from her pillow.  “Go away.”

“Don’t you think it might be helpful to talk to me?”

That didn’t even merit a response.

“I’m sorry about Terrence.”

Rose pushed herself up to sit on the bed then, to glare at the woman looking out of the mirror on her wall.  “Don’t talk about him.  Don’t even say his name.  And you know you’re not sorry.”

Continue reading “Stonehenge Story Starts: Mirror, Mirror (Results)”

Stonehenge Story Starts: Mirror, Mirror… (Prompt)

Welcome to Stonehenge Story Starts, a weekly writing prompt and story sharing opportunity.  Each week, we post a writing prompt: an opening line, a concept, a plot hook, maybe an image.  The following Saturday, we’ll post again with the writing the prompt inspired.

This week’s prompt is: Write a story about a magic mirror—what it can do, how it’s used, and who it’s used by (Prompt courtest of @writingprompts)

Our writers will be writing for the prompts, but anyone is welcome to participate!  Just come by on Sunday to see the week’s prompt, write during the week, and send any writing you’d like to share to StonehengeCircleWriters@gmail.com by the following Friday at 8 pm.  On Saturday we’ll post participants’ writing (with credit to the author, of course).

Write as much or as little as you choose: a paragraph, a flash fiction piece (less than 1,000 words) or a short story.  (Note, for long writing, we may choose to post only a selection.)  You are encouraged to be as creative as possible with the writing prompts.  Try to do something unexpected, or explore a particular genre like science fiction or historical fiction.  Take the prompt literally, or decide it’s a metaphor.  Your only limit is your own imagination.

Happy writing!

 

If you like to plan ahead, next week’s prompt will be: Write a story about a magic mirror—what it can do, how it’s used, and who it’s used by (Prompt courtest of @writingprompts)

 

Stonehenge Story Starts: An Important Discovery (Results)

Happy Saturday!  Our writers went on retreat today, so we’re posting a little later in the day than usual.  Today’s story results were all freshly written this afternoon.

This week’s prompt was: “I knew I’d found something crucial when…” (Prompt courtesy of eadeverrell.com)

Three writers wrote for this prompt, including a new author for this blog, Mattias Bergman.

**********************

Karen Blakely

I knew I’d found something crucial when the door seemed to materialize in the wall right next to me. I’d been down this alley several times before and couldn’t remember ever seeing that door. My stepmother would have pointed out that I probably just hadn’t been paying attention the other times; she liked to point out my deficiencies like that.

But this time she would have been wrong. I was — fairly — certain I’d have noticed this door. It wasn’t like the others that looked like utilitarian rear exits into the alley. None of them were meant for customers. This door, however, was definitely trying to coax people in.

It was arched and ornately carved out of some beautiful dark wood that seemed to shimmer in the hot summer sun. There was a bronze plaque on it with the head of a raven emerging from the top. I had to step closer to make out the words engraved on it. I squinted to see past the dazzle of reflected sunlight.

Bookstore

Books for all Tastes and Needs

Welcome

I stopped and stared; the more I thought about it, the more certain I became that this door had not been here two months ago when I’d last walked this way. Could someone really have opened a new bookstore in that short a period of time? And if so, why have the entrance in the alley?

I’d been in lots of bookstores over the years and had read a variety of welcome signs, but Books for all Tastes and Needs was a new one. Especially since the word Needs seemed to be emphasized; the letters slightly larger and cut more deeply into the bronze. And although I made it a habit to never pass up a bookstore if I could help it, for some reason I felt hesitant about entering this one.

Continue reading “Stonehenge Story Starts: An Important Discovery (Results)”

Stonehenge Story Starts: An Important Discovery (Prompt)

Welcome to Stonehenge Story Starts, a weekly writing prompt and story sharing opportunity.  Each week, we post a writing prompt: an opening line, a concept, a plot hook, maybe an image.  The following Saturday, we’ll post again with the writing the prompt inspired.

This week’s prompt is: “I knew I’d found something crucial when…” (Prompt courtesy of eadeverrell.com)

Our writers will be writing for the prompts, but anyone is welcome to participate!  Just come by on Sunday to see the week’s prompt, write during the week, and send any writing you’d like to share to StonehengeCircleWriters@gmail.com by the following Friday at 8 pm.  On Saturday we’ll post participants’ writing (with credit to the author, of course).

Write as much or as little as you choose: a paragraph, a flash fiction piece (less than 1,000 words) or a short story.  (Note, for long writing, we may choose to post only a selection.)  You are encouraged to be as creative as possible with the writing prompts.  Try to do something unexpected, or explore a particular genre like science fiction or historical fiction.  Take the prompt literally, or decide it’s a metaphor.  Your only limit is your own imagination.

Happy writing!

 

If you like to plan ahead, next week’s prompt will be: Write a story about a magic mirror—what it can do, how it’s used, and who it’s used by (Prompt courtest of @writingprompts)

 

Stonehenge Story Starts: Confessions of a Lifetime (Results)

We hope you’re enjoying your weekend!

This week’s prompt was: You’re immortal, married to a mortal. Today is the day to come clean. (Prompt courtesy of blog.reedsy.com)

Two of our writers explored this prompt, each taking it somewhat loosely and going in two very different directions!

**********************

Karen Blakely returns to the dragon-shifter she introduced in last week’s post.

I’d always enjoyed being a dragon shifter; an immortal member of the Order of Drakon. I’d never considered the possibility of choosing a mortal as a mate, but the bond had snapped into place the moment I’d set eyes on Nora. I’d despaired that I could lose her in the first desperate days as her fragile body fought to live. I’d rejoiced in her will; her determination to survive, though the doctors had been sure the days of exposure in the desert heat had caused too much damage.

Others in town were furious that I’d brought her here to Dark Seighly. I’d violated the primary rule to hold the town secret. But I hadn’t been willing to lose her. Not once I’d found her.

No one knew what to do with her once it was clear she would survive. But I knew.

Continue reading “Stonehenge Story Starts: Confessions of a Lifetime (Results)”

Stonehenge Story Starts: Confession of a Lifetime (Prompt)

Welcome to Stonehenge Story Starts, a weekly writing prompt and story sharing opportunity.  Each week, we post a writing prompt: an opening line, a concept, a plot hook, maybe an image.  The following Saturday, we’ll post again with the writing the prompt inspired.

This week’s prompt is: You’re immortal, and married to a mortal. Today is the day to come clean (Prompt courtesty of blog.reedsy.com)

Our writers will be writing for the prompts, but anyone is welcome to participate!  Just come by on Sunday to see the week’s prompt, write during the week, and send any writing you’d like to share to StonehengeCircleWriters@gmail.com by the following Friday at 8 pm.  On Saturday we’ll post participants’ writing (with credit to the author, of course).

Write as much or as little as you choose: a paragraph, a flash fiction piece (less than 1,000 words) or a short story.  (Note, for long writing, we may choose to post only a selection.)  You are encouraged to be as creative as possible with the writing prompts.  Try to do something unexpected, or explore a particular genre like science fiction or historical fiction.  Take the prompt literally, or decide it’s a metaphor.  Your only limit is your own imagination.

Happy writing!

 

If you like to plan ahead, next week’s prompt will be:  “I knew I’d found something crucial when…” (Prompt courtesy of eadeverrell.com)

Stonehenge Story Starts: Dragons Overhead (Results)

Happy Saturday!  Today we have two stories for your reading pleasure.

This week’s prompt was: A story involving a dragon.

**********************

Cheryl Mahoney shares a prequel story featuring a character from her upcoming fantasy series.

Xevrix screamed into the stillness.  The sound echoed off the tall trees and the high mountain crags, and a flock of birds in the distance took alarmed flight with shrill cries, their dark shapes disappearing into the murky night sky.

Otherwise, it accomplished nothing at all.

She glowered at the nearest thing in her path, an enormous oak that had probably been rooted in place for a century.  She drew back one hand and launched a fireball straight into the heart of the tree.  It kindled, crackled and in moments was a blazing torch.

It was so satisfying that she would have set another, a third, a dozen on fire—but she could feel her breath catching, her legs quivering, and knew that her reserves of magic were too low for this kind of indulgence.  She wasn’t so blind with rage that it could make her stupid.

She let herself flop down to sit on the ground in front of her flaming oak instead, probably getting dirt on her skirt, and reveled in the fire’s heat and glow, watched the flames lick up from one branch to another.

Xevrix was going to burn Krowyn for stranding her here.  Slowly.  She might make it last for days.  If he thought he could steal all the work they had done together, dump her in the wilderness using part of their findings in a kind of added insult—he would regret it.  She would ensure he regretted it, soon and for every moment that remained of his miserable, severely shortened life.

But first she had to get off of this damn mountain.

Continue reading “Stonehenge Story Starts: Dragons Overhead (Results)”